Florencia Muñoz
Más ideas de Florencia
I would love this in a light color (like gray) on forearm or on back of upper arm or something

I would love this in a light color (like gray) on forearm or on back of upper arm or something

Tattoo studio SASHATATTOOING | VK:

Tattoo studio SASHATATTOOING | VK:

Birds in flight on ankle

Birds in flight on ankle

Zodiac star constellation for wrist tattoo | Maybe not on my wrist, but my shoulder blade could be nice:

Zodiac star constellation for wrist tattoo | Maybe not on my wrist, but my shoulder blade could be nice:

Zodiac star constellation for wrist tattoo | Maybe not on my wrist, but my shoulder blade could be nice:

Zodiac star constellation for wrist tattoo | Maybe not on my wrist, but my shoulder blade could be nice:

Viking                                                                                                                                                      More

Viking More

Posted again for the person who just messaged me about the meaning of runes.

Posted again for the person who just messaged me about the meaning of runes.

Posted again for the person who just messaged me about the meaning of runes.

Posted again for the person who just messaged me about the meaning of runes.

Vegvisir. The Icelandic word means guidepost or direction sign. Norse protection symbol, i want tattooed <3

Vegvisir. The Icelandic word means guidepost or direction sign. Norse protection symbol, i want tattooed <3

The Icelandic word Vegvísir literally means ‘guidepost’ or ‘sign pointing out directions’. It is said the bearer will never stay lost, and will always find their way. This symbol is a late Icelandic charm taken from the 17th century Icelandic grimoire called Galdrabók (‘magic book’), which contains many such galdrastafir or magickal charms.

The Icelandic word Vegvísir literally means ‘guidepost’ or ‘sign pointing out directions’. It is said the bearer will never stay lost, and will always find their way. This symbol is a late Icelandic charm taken from the 17th century Icelandic grimoire called Galdrabók (‘magic book’), which contains many such galdrastafir or magickal charms.